A Babymoon in Bermuda…

If you are planning a babymoon in Bermuda then look no further. Not only is it a beautiful destination, it’s only 6.5 hours flight from the UK, a couple of hours from the U.S and more importantly it’s Zika free.
Bermuda is a melting pot of culture; it’s a British Overseas Territory so there are plenty of British quirks to be spotted. From red post boxes to driving on the left hand side of the road they are easy to spot. What’s more there are British style pubs, serving up plenty of British grub. Along with Caribbean and American influences it’s a unique place to visit.
A string of islands connected by bridges, 181 to be precise there is plenty to explore. Bermuda is perfect if you want a laid back trip or an active holiday. Read on for more on a babymoon in Bermuda…

 

Beaches:
As it’s your babymoon you may be looking to get in as much relaxation time as possible before baby arrives, especially if it’s your first. You’ve chosen the right place, as Bermuda’s beaches are beautiful. Warwick Long Bay is one of Bermuda’s famous pink sand beaches. Tobacco Bay is unbelievable for snorkelling, while Horseshoe Bay is perfect for finding a sheltered spot if it’s a bit breezy. On my last visit in November, the beaches were empty and the temperature was a nice 23 degrees. Paddle boarding is a great watersport to do while you are pregnant and Bermuda’s clear waters are perfect for gliding over while catching some rays.

 

Gibbs Hill Lighthouse:
For panoramic views climb the 185 steps to the top. Built in 1846 it is the oldest cast iron lighthouse in the world and one of only two still standing. With views of Hamilton and the South Shore it’s a good way to blow away the cobwebs on a blustery day. If you are not feeling so energetic The Dining Room located in what was the lighthouse keepers cottage at the base serves lunch and dinner. Double check the website as opening hours are varied during the week.

 

Crystal Caves:
For something completely different visit the Crystal and Fantasy Caves. Admire the clear waters of the underground lake in the Crystal Cave from the floating walkways. The stalactite formations are incredible, discovered by two boys playing cricket in 1907; the caves are millions of years old. It’s worth noting that it’s pretty warm in these underground beauties, so dress accordingly and wear rubber-soled shoes. Located in the parish of Hamilton, there are daily tours and tickets can be purchased for one cave or both.

 

Bermuda Railway Trail:
The disused railway trail is a great way to explore. Cycle or walk along the 18 miles through tropical woodland and past turquoise waters. The trail is very well signposted and there are information boards dotted along the route describing the history of the railway. Here’s a little bit more information and images from my bike ride: Biking the Bermuda Railway Trail…

 

Hamilton:
Overlooking the water, capital of Bermuda is a picture perfect town full of pastel coloured buildings. On Front Street you’ll find restaurants, bars and shops, including the good old English store Marks and Spencer. There’s plenty of history to discover too, taking a walking tour or a self-guided tour is a great way to get immersed in the local culture. There are also food tours, although not cheap it looks like a cool thing to do. Sample and learn all about local cuisine while exploring the streets of Hamilton.

 

Getting about:
Tourists aren’t able to hire cars in Bermuda but there are plenty of other options to get around. Twizys are a really fun mode of transport, Current Vehicles rent out the tiny two man electric cars from their branches at the Hamilton Princess, Fairmont Southampton and The Loren at Pink Beach.  Buses are another good option for exploring, pastel pink in colour you can’t miss them. There are eleven routes covering the whole of the island, the main bus station is in Hamilton. Pay on the bus with cash, you’ll need the exact fair or use tickets, tokens or a day pass. These can be purchased at the bus and ferry terminals in Hamilton, information centres, some post offices and hotels. Day passes can also be used on the ferries so may be worth combining for a day out. This brings me onto the ferry service, running from Front Street in Hamilton there are four routes that make a nice alternative to exploring by road. Scooters are another option although if you are heavily pregnant than you might not feel that comfortable on one of these! Taxis are readily available throughout the island and easily picked up from hotels.

 

When to visit:
May to October is the best time of the year to go for beach weather, having said that I visited in November and spent time on the beach. It felt a little chilly when the sun went in and cooler in the evenings but there was still plenty of sunshine. November to February is generally a cooler time of the year with rainy days, the temperature can reach 17 – 18 degrees but you may need warmer clothes on damp days. April and early May is springtime in Bermuda and whilst it may not be warm enough to swim in the sea, if you are from the UK it will feel a lot warmer and sunnier than at home. Pack some light jumpers and jackets along with summer clothes and you’ll be fine. April and May are also cheaper months to visit in terms of accommodation.

 

Useful things to know:
  • The Bermudian Dollar is fixed to the U.S Dollar, which can also be spent in Bermuda.
  • Bermuda has the same voltage as America and Canada. If you are travelling from the UK or Europe pack a two-pronged plug adaptor.
  • Remember to pack your pregnancy notes and double check that your travel insurance covers medical problems during pregnancy.
  • Flight socks are a good idea to wear onboard an aircraft during pregnancy.

 

A babymoon in Bermuda is the perfect choice to get a bit of sunshine and relaxation in before your new arrival makes an appearance and being Zika free will give you a worry free holiday to remember.
For more information on pregnancy related travel I have a blog post all about it here: Planning a baby moon and flying during pregnancy…
Are you planning a babymoon? Any questions? Let me know in the comments below…

 

 

 

 

 

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